The coast  of Morocco

From Asilah in the north to Laayoune in the south, Morocco’s 1,000-kilometre Atlantic coastline is a succession of blue and white citadels, small fishing villages and wild, sandy beaches. Any Morocco holiday is complimented by adding a coastal experience to your personal itinerary. From Marrakech, one can easily add a few nights in either Essaouira or Oualidia (under 3 hours drive). From Fes one can either head north for Tangier or west to El Jadida, Oualidia or a bit further south Essaouira or the wonderful areas around Agadir. Even southern Morocco can be reached within a five hour drive from Agadir. Not to be missed!

Coast map
agadir morocco coast beach holiday

Morocco's premier beach holiday resort and main fishing port, Agadir is a largely modern city. Rebuilt after a devastating earthquake in 1960, Agadir is the place to go if you want clean beaches and first-class tourist facilities. With over 300 days of sunshine a year, Agadir competes with the Canary Islands as a winter destination for sun-starved Europeans. Miles of sandy beaches offer windsurfing, sailing and water-skiing, as well as some of the best seafood in Morocco.

Dakhla Morocco

Dakhla is an ocean paradise on the edge of Morocco's far southern Sahara desert. Sun and sea-worshippers will love it (Saharan heat and water temperatures reaching 80 degrees year-round), as will surfers, kite-surfers and people who like to fish. A holiday to Dakhla won't leave you disappointed...

el jadida beach morocco golf holiday

The Portuguese settled in El Jadida in 1502 and built a fortified town that they named Mazagan. In the old cité portugaise you can go for a walk around the ramparts, admire some fine 16th century doorways and observe the play of light and water in the old underground cistern. 

essaouira coast morocco holiday

With its brilliant blue and white architecture, windswept beach and easy-going charm, Essaouira is a popular excursion for day-trippers from Marrakech. It’s also a great place to kick back and relax for a few days.  

Probably the best-known coastal town of Morocco, Essaouira has been occupied over the centuries by the Carthaginians, Romans and Portuguese. Behind the 18th century sea walls are thuya wood workshops, artists’ enclaves and silent alleyways where cats sun themselves and veiled women emerge from studded doorways. The harbour is a photographer’s dream, with fishing nets laid out on the quayside, boats unloading their catches and the smell of freshly-grilled sardines and lobster in the air.

oualidia lagoon beach morocco coast hippocampe sultana

Once called ‘Morocco’s best-kept secret’, Oualidia is a fishing village spread around a sheltered, sandy lagoon. There are no sights to see and no souvenirs to buy: Oualidia is a place to swim, sunbathe, birdwatch and commune with nature. 

rabat holiday morocco

Morocco’s capital doesn't have the wow-factor of Marrakech; Nor does it have the hordes of tourists. Rabat is  sedate but has a star attraction – the old Kasbah des Oudaïas, perched high above the Atlantic rollers.

Tangier, Northern Morocco Holidays

Despite a wave of development, Tangier still retains the raffish charm it enjoyed as an International Zone from 1912 to 1956. Its radiant light, picturesque medina and fine views over the straights of Gibraltar have attracted artists and writers from Matisse to Paul Bowles and the Beat poets.